Ogletree-Brooks Plagiarism Story: An Analysis

October 27, 2006

Ogletree misquote from only source not cited by Brooks

Filed under: Uncategorized — R.O. Denver @ 12:52 pm

In addition to Ogletree’s plagiarism (with minor rewording) of 4 sentences from Brooks’s book, in the same order those sentences appear in Brooks’s book, it turns out that the only source cited by Ogletree in the endnotes of the offending paragraph which was not cited in Brooks’s book contains a serious misquote. As a whole, this paragraph hardly appears to be the sort of thing which would be written by a tenured Harvard law professor who is an expert in the field of racial discrimination, perhaps raising questions regarding who in fact drafted this section of the book.

On page 103, Ogletree’s book quotes a 1970 article in the Journal of Black Studies, as saying that W. E. B. Du Bois “called for ‘full access to the American dream on terms not left to the caprice of a racist majority.'” The cite is to endnote 29, which appears on page 342 (citing Joanna Schneider Zangrando and Roert L. Zangrando, “Black Protest: A Rejection of the American Dream,” Journal of Black Studies 1 (1970): 145). In fact, the article (on page 145) states that Du Bois demanded “full access to the dream and the melting pot, on terms not left to the caprice of a racist majority.”

The cover page and initial two pages of the journal article quoted by Ogletree are here, here, and here.

The page of the journal article misquoted by Ogletree is here.

Images of pages of Brooks and Ogletree books

Filed under: Uncategorized — R.O. Denver @ 12:37 pm

Set forth here for easy reference are links to the following pages of the Ogletree and Brooks books, with the portions of the Brooks book which were copied into the Ogletree manuscript (with minor wording changes) highlighted in yellow, and with the offending paragraph in Ogletree’s book likewise highlighted in yellow.

BROOKS BOOK

Front pages here and here.

Page 128 (start of section on Du Bois) here.

Page 129 (first two sentences which were copied) here.

Page 130 (third and fourth sentences which were copied) here.

Endnotes to this section (pages 313 and 314) here and here.

OGLETREE BOOK

Front pages here and here.

Page 103 (paragraph with four sentences copied from Brooks book) here.

Endnotes to this paragraph (page 342) here.

THREE PRINCIPAL PAGES IN ORDER

Finally, for easy visual reference here are the three principal pages on the same webpage — the two Brooks pages from which the Ogletree paragraph was copied, and the Ogletree page containing that paragraph:

Brooks page 129:

brooks4

Brooks page 130:

brooks5

Ogletree page 103:

ogletree3

Similarities between 1996 Brooks book and 2004 Ogletree book

Filed under: Uncategorized — R.O. Denver @ 12:18 pm

Roy L. Brooks, Integration or Separation?: A Strategy for Racial Equality (Cambridge: Harvard Univ. Press. 1996), pages 129-30 (endnotes omitted).

This passage contains Brooks’s discussion of W. E. B. Du Bois, and his conclusion regarding one important characteristic shared by both Du Bois and Booker T. Washington.

 

W. E. B. Du Bois

During most of his career Du Bois presented himself as a staunch integrationist and demanded freedom of speech, education, “manhood suffrage;” and “the abolition of all caste distinctions based simply on race and color.” These tenets would become the foundation of the Niagara Movement, founded by a small group of African American intellectuals critical of Washington; it would in turn spawn the NAACP in 1910.

* * *

[De Bois urged that] African Americans must make choices that are beneficial to their community, such as supporting African American merchants.

* * *

Booker T. Washington and W. E. B. Du Bois each offered a unique civil rights strategy. Though they may have been bitter enemies, they were identical in one important respect throughout their lives both men were deeply committed to making life better for African Americans.

* * *

Charles J. Ogletree, Jr., All Deliberate Speed: Reflections on the First Half Century of Brown v. Board of Education (New York: W. W. Norton & Co. 2004) (paperback edition, 2005), page 103.

This paragraph contains Ogletree’s remarkably similar discussion of W. E. B. Du Bois, including Brooks’s conclusion regarding one important characteristic shared by both Du Bois and Booker T. Washington.

Four sentences were copied out of Brooks’s book, with only minor rewording. The four sentences appear in the same order as in Brooks’s book.

There are two endnotes to this paragraph in Ogletree’s book; in neither is there any citation to Brooks’s book. These four sentences, and indeed the entire substance of the paragraph, were lifted from Brooks’s book without Brooks being given any credit for his analysis, and his writing, concerning the career of W. E. B. Du Bois. Instead this analysis and writing was passed off as Ogletree’s own.

. . . [Du Bois’s] demands included freedom of speech, education, “manhood suffrage,” and “the abolition of all caste distinctions based simply on race and color.” These tenets became the basis of the Niagara movement, founded by a small group of African-American intellectuals critical of Washington; it in turn spawned the NAACP in 1910. Du Bois implored African-Americans to make choices that benefited their community, such as supporting African-American merchants. Despite the differences in Washington’s and Du Bois’s approaches, both men were deeply committed to making life better for African-Americans.

Harvard Crimson story on newly discovered plagiarism by Prof. Charles Ogletree

Filed under: Uncategorized — R.O. Denver @ 12:07 pm

Today’s Harvard Crimson has a story today on additional plagiarism by Prof. Charles Ogletree in his 2004 book, All Deliberate Speed, here. It is mentioned in Howard Bashman’s popular blog, “How Appealing,” here.

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